Key Design Features

  • FLEXIBLE VENUE SPACE
  • STUNNING VIEW OF THE NEWLY REMODELED KANSAS STATE CAPITOL
  • BUILT TO ENTERTAIN
  • PICTURE PERFECT GRAND STAIRCASE
  • BEAUTIFUL EUROPEAN STAINED GLASS
  • ALFRED, LORD TENNYSON'S POEM OF LANCELOT IS TOLD AND ILLUSTRATED IN STAINED GLASS
  • CRAFTSMANSHIP AT THE HIGHEST LEVEL
  • THE USE OF LIONS THROUGHOUT THE HOUSE
  • A LOVE OF LITERATURE
  • HERMES STAND GUARD ABOVE THE DOOR
 

From the Beginning...

CONSTRUCTION BEGAN IN 1911 TO CREATE BOTH A HOME AND ENTERTAINMENT SPACE FOR HIRAM PRICE DILLON AND HIS FAMILY

...built in the Italian Renaissance style the Dillon House is a rare survivor of an elite pre-World War I residential neighborhood. Its overall form and many of the character-defining features are still clearly evident today. A passionate man famous for his hospitality, Hiram Price Dillon’s robust spirit is evident throughout the house — the lions at the entry stairs and the main staircase, the strong male figures that support mantels and the dramatic backdrop of stained glass windows at the main stair. His rare heart and love of playing host is evidenced by the motto, “None come too early, none stay too late” emblazoned on the fireplace of the Reception Hall. The Dillon House is unique in that it was built in a grand style that was intended for entertaining. More than 100 years after it was built, the Dillon House is remarkable for the quality of the original ornament that remains. From its stone, brick and clay tile exterior to the beautiful stained glass, wood work, fireplaces and grand staircase inside, much of the character that dazzled its visitors in the early 1900s remains intact.

Looking Inside

EACH ROOM SERVED ITS OWN UNIQUE PURPOSE - WE HAVE CAREFULLY RESTORED THEM TO ENHANCE AND RECALL THOSE DAYS

GRAND HALL
The central space of the first floor is the impressive Reception Hall. It is distinguished by hardwood floors, wood paneling, chandelier and a marble and cast stone fireplace adorned with figurines, cupids and garland, and the motto “None come too early, none stay too late,” echoing the hospitality for which the Dillon family was known.

LIBRARY
The formal Library retains its built-in book shelves, stained wood wainscot and a green-tiled fireplace, inscribed with a quote from Shakespeare: “My library was dukedom large enough.” This room also includes intricate stained glass windows featuring publisher’s marks from major printing houses and portraits of renowned authors. Leaded glass windows with stained glass panels also grace the split landing of the Main Stair; these depict scenes from Lord Tennyson’s “The Idylls of the King.” Initial study suggests that these stained glass windows may be significant antiques of English origin.

WEST WING
The former Music and Dining Rooms, once separated by a hallway and elevator, are now one large space, which can be divided to create two separate rooms, much like its original design and intention.
The Music Room is where Hiram's wife, Susie Dillon, entertained their guests with beautiful music. Susie was an accomplished pianist, and she had just the right instrument to showcase her talents.  The piano now known as "Goldie".